Career and career guidance in the Nordic countries – Call for papers

Editors: Erik Hagaseth Haug, Tristram Hooley, Jaana Kettunen and Rie Thomsen.

Overview: The Nordic countries have a range of strong cultural, political and geographical similarities that make it useful for them to be considered together. However, despite the cultural and political similarities of the Nordic countries they are less homogenous than outsiders often assume. Superficial similarities mask substantial differences which manifest in different aspects of culture, education and work life. This book will explore career guidance in the Nordic countries and lay the ground for a discussion on whether a ‘Nordic model of career guidance’ has emerged.

This volume will be the first of its kind.  It will be published in English to make insights and inspiration from career guidance in the Nordic countries more available to an international audience. The volume will make it possible for practitioners and policymakers to compare experiences and learn from each other’s effort. It will also  support scholarly debate about the unique contributions to career guidance made by the countries in the region. The volume will consider the way in which the different traditions, philosophies, cultures, politics and practices in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden and other Nordic territories have framed the development of career guidance across the region. The book will also consider what implications for international policy and practice are offered by a consideration of the Nordic region.

We are in discussion with a number of possible publishers and will be submitting a full proposal document following the submission of abstracts.

Structure: We are seeking papers which address the following themes:

  • the development and role of education, work and career in the Nordic countries;
  • Nordic career guidance: policy, theory and practice. Especially transversal papers addressing key themes in guidance across the Nordic countries;
  • country papers summarising key policies and practices in each of the Nordic countries; and
  • challenges, innovations and issues. Thematic papers addressing issues particular to one or more of the Nordic countries.

Abstracts: Abstracts of your proposed manuscript should be no more than 300 words. They should set out the key focus of the proposed chapter and highlight what empirical data, evidence or analyses this paper will be based on. We welcome collaborations from multiple authors, especially where this helps to broaden the focus across a range of Nordic countries.

Abstracts should be accompanied with a brief (50-100 word) biography of the authors.

Please submit abstracts of your proposed manuscript by email to Erik.haug@inn.no

Timetable: A final timetable will be agreed with the publishers once we have submitted the full proposal. The following is an indicative timetable.

14th October 2017 Call for papers issued
22nd December 2017 Deadline for submission of abstracts
31st January 2018 Feedback on abstracts and notification of the papers to be included
27th April 2018 First draft
1st June 2018 Feedback on first draft
28th September 2018 Revised/final draft submitted
1st December 2018 Final manuscript submitted to the publisher
January – April 2019 Proofs
May 2019 Publication

If you have additional questions regarding the call for papers, please contact one of the four editors.

Erik Haug (Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway): erik.haug@inn.no

Tristram Hooley (Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway): thooley@careersandenterpise.co.uk

Jaana Kettunen (Finnish Institute for Educational Research, University of Jyväskylä): jaana.h.kettunen@jyu.fi

Rie Thomsen (Aarhus University, Denmark): Riet@edu.au.dk

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Redefining career guidance #BERA2017

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Today I’m participating in a symposium at #BERA2017. In it I’m going to be discussing the terminology that we use when talking about career and career guidance. I’m going to argue that seeking alternative terminology is not helpful as it leads us into an endless round of renaming things but doesn’t really address the concerns that people have with concepts like career and career guidance. Instead we need to spend more time on defining what we mean and using the discussion of definitions as a way to expand people’s conceptual understanding and career thinking.

This is what I thought I would cover.

Redefining career guidance

Hey good lookin’

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Julia Yates and I have just published a short article in Graduate Market Trends which draws together some of the research that we’ve been doing on career image and examines what this means from the perspective of higher education students, graduates and the career professionals who work with them.

The article is free to download either from Graduate Market Trends or from the UDORA archive.

Yates, J. and Hooley, T. (2017). Hey good lookin’. Graduate Market Trends, Summer, 12-13.

I’d be interested to hear what you think about it.

Publication of You’re Hired! Graduate Career Handbook brought forwards!

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I’ve got a new book coming out next week called You’re Hired! Graduate Career Handbook. The book was originally supposed to be released at the start of next term, but there has been a lot of interest in it and so we managed to persuade the publishers to push it out a bit quicker to allow people to get hold of a copy over the summer.

The book offers a comprehensive guide to career planning and job hunting for students and graduates. I think that what is different about this book in comparison to some of the other volumes out there is that we take a holistic view of career rather than just talking about how to beat your way through recruitment processes.

The book covers thinking about what to do with your life, how to make the most of your time at university, building up experience and networks, making the transition to further learning and work and perhaps most importantly being prepared to make a plan B and deal with setbacks. So we think that it should be essential reading for everyone from those who are about to start at university to those who are currently a couple of years into their graduate career and wondering where it all went wrong. Your career is something that you build everyday and it is never too late (or too early) to take action.

So (pre-)order your copy today!

Gender and apprenticeships

Female Construction Apprentice

I’m excited about the future of vocational education. There is so much going on right now with the T-levels and the apprenticeship levy. There is at least a possibility that we are seeing a serious step forwards in vocational education in England at the moment. What is more, I’m pretty sure that this is a cross-party issue and so even if we do see a change in government the focus on vocational education and skills is likely to endure.

However, there are some things that are concerning about the way that vocational education tends to channel certain young people into certain careers. There is clearly a strong class dimension to this, which I’m also interested in, but in this post I’d like to look at the issue of gender.

A joint TUC and YWCA paper (Apprenticeships and Gender) published a few years ago concluded that the expansion in apprenticeships had replicated traditional gender segregation in the labour market. More recent work by the Young Women’s Trust (Making Apprenticeships Work for Young Women) notes that since 2010 women apprentices have outnumbered men, but that male apprentices get paid 21% more on average.

The Young Women’s Trust presents the following chart to show how male and female apprenticeships differ by sector.

gender differences

What it shows is that women are concentrated in health and social care, business administration and childcare and education. In contrast male apprentices are present in a lot more sectors and have less of a profile in these traditionally low paying sectors.

These differences play out in terms of pay, but they also play out in terms of job quality with female apprentices less likely to report training and more likely to lose their job at the end of the apprenticeship.

All of this is very concerning, but not in all honesty completely unexpected. Similar issues have been reported in the past (as this 2006 article by the Equal Opportunities commission shows). Inevitably the reasons for this phenomenon are complex. It undoubtedly includes a dose of good old fashioned sexism, but the associations of gender with particular parts of the labour market are more complex than this. They undoubtedly include questions about self- and career- identity in young people. How far they can imagine themselves in different careers. They also clearly relate to employer expectations and to the ever questionable idea of ‘cultural fit’. ‘Someone like her just wouldn’t fit in here‘ is a much used excuse.

I don’t have any easy answers as to what it is possible to do about this. But what I am sure is that achieving any change on this issue will require shifts on both the supply and demand side of the labour market. We need both young people and employers to think and act differently. It will also require changes pre-, during, and post- vocational education programme. In other words people need to be recruited differently, supported better whilst on programme and then given ongoing support to transition to the labour market. All of these changes need to be actively alert to gender rather than simply trying to be ‘gender neutral’ – delivering a major cultural change is not going to be easy.

I’d be really interested to hear people’s thoughts about how they deal with some of these issues in career education and guidance processes.

 

 

How Careers Work: Observations of an Applied Researcher (8th June)

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Wednesday 8 June

5.30 – 6.30pm

We are delighted to welcome Wendy Hirsh our Visiting Professor of Career Development to iCeGS on the 8th June. Wendy will be sharing her reflections on ‘how careers work’. .

Wendy will base the lecture on a range of applied research projects that she has undertaken where individuals have discussed how they make decisions about work, learning and the future.  In the lecture, Wendy will illustrate how her experiences shaped her own ideas about career development. Debate will be warmly welcomed.

We’d like to invite everyone to join us in Derby for this exciting inaugural lecture.

Book your place for How Careers Work