Digital guidance – how to career online

digital guidance - how to career online

Tomorrow I’m giving a webinar for the CDAA in Australia on all things internet and career. There is still time to sign up if you are interested.

As usual I’m sharing my slide from the presentation – so feel free to use and abuse them however you see fit.

digital guidance – how to career online

The presentation builds on the book that I did last year called You’re Hired! Job Hunting Online. So grab yourself a copy of that book if you haven’t got one yet.

Free downloadable guide for HE staff to use with You’re Hired! Graduate Career Handbook

Graduate-Career-Handbook-supplementary-guide-204x300

I wrote yesterday about our new book You’re Hired! Graduate Career Handbook. This book is going to be released the start of next week, but you can of course pre-order now.

In the meantime I’d like to share with you the free guide that we’ve made for HE staff. If you follow this blog you are probably more likely to be a careers person or an academic than a current student (although I welcome all readers). We wrote the actual book for students, but we thought that it would be useful to think about how academics and careers educators might make use of it as part of their delivery of careers and employability modules and programmes.

The guide covers how to use the Graduate Career Handbook in the following situations.

  • To support career conversations and as part of careers advice and guidance
  • To support students when they are networking with employers and undertaking placements and other kinds of extra-curricular experiences.
  • To run employability workshops.
  • To design employability modules and programmes.

We ‘ve included a load of workshop plans, draft module specifications with learning outcomes and an extensive reading list to support modules.

Hopefully you will find it useful.

Publication of You’re Hired! Graduate Career Handbook brought forwards!

Grad-Career-Handbook-cover

I’ve got a new book coming out next week called You’re Hired! Graduate Career Handbook. The book was originally supposed to be released at the start of next term, but there has been a lot of interest in it and so we managed to persuade the publishers to push it out a bit quicker to allow people to get hold of a copy over the summer.

The book offers a comprehensive guide to career planning and job hunting for students and graduates. I think that what is different about this book in comparison to some of the other volumes out there is that we take a holistic view of career rather than just talking about how to beat your way through recruitment processes.

The book covers thinking about what to do with your life, how to make the most of your time at university, building up experience and networks, making the transition to further learning and work and perhaps most importantly being prepared to make a plan B and deal with setbacks. So we think that it should be essential reading for everyone from those who are about to start at university to those who are currently a couple of years into their graduate career and wondering where it all went wrong. Your career is something that you build everyday and it is never too late (or too early) to take action.

So (pre-)order your copy today!

The class ceiling

class ceiling

Thanks to Steve Rooney for putting me onto the very excellent Class Ceiling website. The site is run by Sam Friedman, Daniel Laurison and Ian McDonald and funded by the ESRC and London School of Economics. It basically documents the enduring importance of class as a way of understanding British society.

The site is full of stories and statistics that make this point. Here are just a few to get you riled up.

  • In higher managerial and professional occupations people from working-class backgrounds earn on average 16% less than those from privileged backgrounds. This amounts to an average of £6,800. This grows if you look at more elite professions such as finance and medicine.
  • Although only a third of the population come from professional backgrounds they make up 73% of doctors, 62% of lawyers and 58% of academics.

This body of research is really valuable for discussions about social mobility and social equity.

Enjoy looking into it and channel your sense of outrage!

Work experience and volunteering – what works?

In case you missed our third ‘what works’ seminar we’ve put together some video resources to give you access to the talks from the event. The video above provides you with a quick taster of the event. But you can also see the full talk from Johnathan Buzzeo on work experience and Joy Williams on volunteering.

We’ll be releasing more detailed reports on these issues in the autumn – but in the meantime I hope that you find this a useful summary of the evidence base.

John Holman explaining the Gatsby Benchmarks for ‘good career guidance’

I’ve just found this film from last year’s Education and Employers conference of John Holman talking about the development of the Good Career Guidance report.

Since then the Gatsby Benchmarks have really become firmly embedded into our thinking about what constitutes effective careers work in schools.  Given this it is really good to be able to hear John’s defence of the framework.

National Conference on Careers Work in Schools

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Every year David Andrews organises a two-day conference for careers leaders in schools and for advisers and consultants working with schools.  This year’s event is in on 16 & 17 November, in York.  Keynote speakers include me! In addition there will be presentations from Claudia Harris (The Careers & Enterprise Company) and Professor Wendy Hirsh who will be talking about what’s really happening in the labour market.  The programme also includes updates on national developments, case studies of good practice and a workshop on evaluating impact.

Residential and day delegate options are available.  It is well worth booking a place if you can (see link below).

Flyer and booking form York 2017